Tsuda Laboratory

Spaceflight Mechanics and Exploration Systems Laboratory

Introduction.


The Spaceflight Mechanics and Exploration Systems Laboratory (Tsuda Laboratory) is affiliated with The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, SOKENDAI and the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). We conduct unique research and project activities in ISAS.

Our research focuses on the application of Astrodynamics (Space Flight Mechanics) to real exploration missions. These include, but are not limited to, orbital design of deep space exploration satellites and probes, research of Solar System exploration methods and guidance, navigation and control systems for spacecraft. We carry out experimental and analytical approaches to spacecraft system design.

Hayabusa 2 Seconds after Ryugu Touchdown Lab Members
Hayabusa 2 Operations Surface of Ryugu Render of Haya 2 sensors
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News.


Prof. Tsuda Book
2020.11.16

Book Publication

A book written by Prof. Tsuda has been published. The book depicts the thrill of the Hayabusa 2 project as it has been lived by the project members. It doesn't get any more real! (Kashioka)
Drop Tower Experiment
2020.10.23

Drop Tower Experiment

I had a Drop Tower experiment in Hokkaido, Japan. The purpose is to investigate how sand behaves when it is sprayed with thrusters under microgravity. The results are very worth analyzing and I look forward to future research. (Yamakawa)
Welcome Newcomer!
2020.08.03

Welcome Newcomer!

Ms. Kaoru Namiki has joined Tsuda Lab as a new student of SOKENDAI University this April. We have been having online meetings due to COVID19, but we will continue to work hard together with new members! (Kashioka)
Ukaren 2019
2019.11.18

UKAREN 2019

We participated in the 63rd UKAREN at Tokushima. We discussed with the presenters from other fields and received questions and advice on my research through the presentations, which stimulated our research. (Yamakawa)

Research.


Research topics are always aimed at the overlap between engineering applications and theoretical approaches to the problems. Some of these research projects carried out together with the laboratory students are:

In our laboratory, you can engage in practical research and development through projects with ISAS.

Students belonging to the Tsuda Laboratory are working in collaboration with the Kawaguchi Laboratory and Kawakatsu Laboratory of the University of Tokyo and SOKENDAI. Research consultation with diverse professional researchers, engineers, and staff at the Institute for Space and Astronautical Science is easily available for all students. This environment allows students to not only conduct research, but also be actively involved in ISAS projects and the creation and design of future missions of the agency. This experience is unique to students in ISAS, and not easy to come by at other University laboratories.

To know more about our research activities, you can click below the topic you are interested in.

Astrodynamics

Astrodynamics

Optical Navigation

Optical Navigation

Attitude Dynamics

Attitude Dynamics

Scattering in Microgravity

Scattering in Microgravity

Prof. Yuichi Tsuda Bio.


Yuichi Tsuda

Prof. Yuichi Tsuda

Professor & Hayabusa 2 Project Manager

Professor Yuichi Tsuda was born in 1975. Graduated from the Department of Aerospace Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo, and completed the doctoral program in the Department of Aerospace Engineering, the same graduate school. Ph.D. (Engineering). In 2015, he became the youngest project manager in history (Hayabusa2 project). Specializes in space engineering, aerospace dynamics, and solar system exploration. His papers include "Achievement of Asteroid Landing by Hayabusa2", The Japan Society for Aeronautics and Astronautics, Vol. 67, No. 9 (2019). "Hayabusa2 The Truth of the Strongest Mission" is the first book he published.

Members.


Our laboratory includes ISAS staff (administration and research), as well as full-time and exchange students.

We have a mix of japanese and international members, ranging from technical trainees and Master's students to PhD students and postdoc researchers. We value knowledge exchange and mentoring, so we hold regular meetings where all members are avaialbale for consultation on research and everyday activities. Feel free to contact any of our members with regards to our laboratory daily life and experience!

Staff.

Yuki Takao

Yuki Takao

JSPS Postdoc

Orbital Mechanics, Solar Sail, Image Processing

Miwa Fukazawa

Miwa Fukazawa

Secretary

Makes our life easier!.

Current Members.

Shuya Kashioka

Shuya Kashioka

D3 / The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, SOKENDAI

Solar Radiation Presure, Image Processing

Ryotaro Sakamoto

Ryotaro Sakamoto

D2 / Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado

Debris, Attitude Dynamics

Roger Gutierrez Ramon

Roger Gutierrez Ramon

D2 / The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, SOKENDAI

Orbital Mechanics, Data-Driven Dynamical Systems

Genki Ohira

Genki Ohira

D1 / The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, SOKENDAI

Image Processing

Maiko Yamakawa

Maiko Yamakawa

M2 / The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, SOKENDAI

Fluid Dynamics

Kaoru Namiki

Kaoru Namiki

M1 / The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, SOKENDAI

Orbital Mechanics, Fluid Dynamics

Past Members.

Manel Caballero

Manel Caballero

Short-term International Student

Miyuki Kadokura

Miyuki Kadokura

Special Joint Researcher

Alessandro Latino

Alessandro Latino

Short-term International Student

Daniel Villegas Pinto

Daniel Villegas Pinto

Short-term International Student

Giacomo Acciarini

Giacomo Acciarini

Short-term International Student

Tommaso Pino

Tommaso Pino

Short-term International Student

Stefania Soldini

Stefania Soldini

JSPS Postdoc

Coleen Madlinger

Coleen Madlinger

MIT-JAPAN Short-term Training Program

Publications.


Here you can find some selected publications from our lab members. If you want to see the full list, please click on the button below.

Flight Status of Robotic Asteroid Sample Return Mission Hayabusa2

Tsuda, Y., Nakazawa, S., Kushiki, K., Yoshikawa, M., Kuninaka, H., Watanabe, S.


Hayabusa 2 status

Abstract

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency launched the asteroid sample return spacecraft “Hayabusa2” on December 3, 2014. Hayabusa2 will reach the C-type asteroid 1999 JU3 in 2018, and return back to the Earth in 2020. Sample collections from three sites, four surface rovers deployment and a 4 MJ-class kinetic impact crater generation are planned in the 1.5 years of the asteroid-proximity operation. The mission objective of Hayabusa2 has three aspects, science, engineering and exploration, all of which would be expanded by the successful round-trip journey. This paper describes the outline of the Hayabusa2 mission and the current flight status after the seven month of the interplanetary cruise.


Generalized Attitude Model for Spinning Solar Sail Spacecraft

Tsuda, Y., Saiki, T., Funase, R., Mimasu, Y.


Spinning Solar Sail Spacecraft

Abstract

An attitude model for a general spinning solar sail spacecraft under the influence of solar radiation pressure is presented. This model, called “Generalized Spinning Sail Model”, can be applied to realistic sails with nonflat surfaces that have nonuniform optical properties. The unique behaviors predicted by the generalized spinning sail model are verified by actual operation of the Japanese spinning solar sail spacecraft IKAROS. It is shown how imperfections in the sail surface affect the attitude motion of spinning sails, and a compact mathematical model that can precisely reproduce the spin-averaged motion of the spinning sails is derived. The stability conditions and a reduced model that preserves the key characteristics of the generalized spinning sail model are also derived to reveal the unique properties of the attitude behavior of spinning sails.


Solar Radiation Pressure-Assisted Fuel-Free Sun Tracking and Its Application to Hayabusa2

Tsuda, Y., Ono, G., Saiki, T., Mimasu, Y., Ogawa, N., Terui, F.


Solar Radiation Pressure Hayabusa 2

Abstract

This paper describes the modeling, dynamical characteristics, and implementation of an attitude control method that actively uses solar radiation pressure. The theory behind this control method is called the generalized sail dynamics model, which was developed by the authors and successfully applied to Hayabusa2, which is a Japanese asteroid explorer launched in 2014. The quasi-stable property of the dynamics is proved, which enables the implementation of a fuel-free sun-tracking attitude using only one reaction wheel. As of August 2016, the attitude of Hayabusa2 was maintained within 10 deg offset from the sun direction for 193 days in total without consuming any fuel. The auto-sun tracking, single-wheel, and fuel-free features were distinctive as compared to any other conventional control methods, such as three-axis stabilization, and brought many merits to practical spacecraft operations. The theoretical background, the prelaunch evaluation based on a finite element model analysis, the identification process of the dynamics model carried out for the Hayabusa2 mission operation, and their effectiveness are presented in this paper.


Contact us.


To anyone who wants to engage in research activities.

Depending on your situation, please follow the links and procedures detailed below.

If you would like to ask a question about the laboratory directly or if your personal situation does not fit into any of the following sections, please contact the following address:

tsuda.yuichi "at" jaxa.jp (Please change "at" to @)

The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, SOKENDAI.

At Sokendai, it is possible to enroll in a five-year Doctoral program after completing a Bachelor's degree.

For details, go to The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, SOKENDAI School Entrance Examination.

JAXA Graduate Student Education / Research Guidance System / Student Training System.

Our laboratory accepts JAXA Graduate Student Education and Research Guidance System participants at any time. This is a system that allows students of universities and graduate schools in Japan and overseas to receive training guidance at JAXA based on applications from their universities and graduate schools.

For details, go to Acceptance of Graduate Students (Japanese language only).

For postdocs.

In order to come to Tsuda Laboratory in a postdoc position, you need to follow one of the methods below (depending on your specific personal situation):

JAXA International Top Young Fellowship (ITYF)

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Research Fellow PD

Recruitment of fixed-term project researchers (Japanese language only)

Access.


Tsuda Laboratory is located in the premises of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, in Sagamihara (Kanagawa Prefecture).

ISAS is conveniently located near central Tokyo and Haneda Airport. From the main stations in west side of Tokyo (Shinjuku, Shibuya) it takes around one hour to reach ISAS with public transportation, using any of the train lines available (Odakyu Line, Nagatsuta Line, or JR Yokohama Line from Yokohama).

From Fuchinobe Station on the JR Yokohama Line.

Walking: About 20 minutes from the south exit.

Bus: Fuchinobe Station South Exit Bus Stop No. 2

Bus number 36 or 37: bound for Fuchinobe Station South Exit (ride time about 10 minutes)

"Municipal Museum" bus stop (3 minute walk to ISAS).

From Sagamiono Station on the Odakyu Line.

Bus: Sagamiono Station No. 5 platform

Bus number 02: bound for "Sagamihara Station" (ride time about 20 minutes)

"Space Science Research Headquarters Entrance" bus stop (5 minute walk to ISAS).

From Haneda or Narita Airports.

For information on access to the campus from the Tokyo Airports, please check the ISAS access webpage.

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